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Then & Now: 1973 and 2017 Honda Civic hatch

To mark the arrival of the new 2017 Honda Civic hatch, let’s compare the latest model with the 1973 Honda Civic – the first Civic hatch to arrive in Australia. We’ve taken a look at things such as power, space, and price.

Power
The 2017 Honda Civic hatch comes with two different engines depending on the model. The all-new 1.5-litre VTEC Turbo engine produces 127kW of power and 220Nm of torque, and the naturally-aspirated 1.8-litre engine produces 104kW and 174Nm. The 1973 Honda Civic produced 48.4kW and 93Nm from its 1.2-litre four-cylinder engine.

Acceleration
The 2017 Honda Civic will sprint from 0-100km/h in approximately 9.2 seconds. This is more than four seconds quicker than the original 1973 Honda Civic, which recorded a 0-60mp/h time of 13.7 seconds. In its day, the 1973 Civic would have been on par acceleration-wise with the Datsun 1200, Ford Escort, Mazda 1300 and Toyota Corolla.

Weight
The 1973 Honda Civic tipped the scales at a mere 657kg. The 2017 Civic hatch weighs in at nearly double that figure at 1289kg. It’s fair to say the 2017 Civic has beefed up in size and safety – things that add weight.

Fuel consumption
The 1973 Civic featured a 38-litre fuel tank, whereas the new model features a 47-litre fuel tank. The 1973 Civic used around 7.5L/100km. Given the 2017 Honda Civic hatch (equipped with the 1.5-litre VTEC Turbo engine) is bigger, more comfortable, higher-performing and safer, it trumps the ’73 model with a fuel consumption figure of just 6.1L/100km.

Space
What about space? The 2017 Civic hatch wins, of course, offering 414-litres with the rear seats up. The 1973 Civic? 160-litres.

Price
In 1973 the Civic three-door with Hondamatic (automatic) transmission cost $2,469. In 2016, that equates to $22,437 using the RBA inflation calculator. The 2017 Honda Civic VTi hatch has a RRP of $22,390.

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Josh Bennis

Josh has worked within the automotive journalism landscape for the best part of a decade. He's driven everything from a 1972 Mazda 808 station wagon to an Aston Martin DBS. Josh's job is to make sure New Vehicle Buyer readers remain informed and entertained on a daily basis.

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